Dogs on steroids long term effects

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an inherited predisposition to develop skin problems from exposure to variety of commonplace and otherwise harmless substances including the pollens of weeds, grasses and trees, as well as house dust mites and mold spores.  Diagnosis of AD is made based on the results of intradermal skin testing or by in vitro blood testing.  Skin testing is the preferred method; small injections of many different allergens are made in the skin on the pet’s side, under light sedation.  Observation of the reactions helps us compile a list of allergens for a “vaccine” that is made to decrease the pet’s sensitivity.  Sometimes multiple skin and/or blood tests are necessary to accurately assess the patient’s allergies.

The most basic treatments do not involve medications. Since obesity dramatically complicates collapsing trachea (and all respiratory problems), it is crucial that dogs with this condition maintain a healthy weight. They should be walked with harnesses rather than neck leads to prevent compression of the trachea by the collar. They also should avoid heavy activity and excitement on hot days, because heat markedly increases the amount of work that is required of the windpipe. It also is important to identify and treat other conditions (such as heart conditions and lung infections) that can cause similar symptoms and that are also common in dogs that are prone to collapsing trachea.

An elimination diet, for example, can help pinpoint if your pet is allergic to a specific food. This would mean that rather than requiring steroid therapy like prednisone, you would just need to avoid that ingredient when shopping for or making your dog’s food. If you are wanting to stick to a more organic line of treatment, research homeopathic or herbal options available. The veterinarian can assess the severity of your dog’s condition and determine the best route of care. He can also decide if alternative treatment like vitamin therapy or hemp products is a possibility for treatment.

People medications are not safe for pets
Please don’t ever give your dog an NSAID that has been approved for use in people. Some examples include Advil®, Motrin®, Ibuprofen, Aleve®, Naprosyn, and Celebrex®. When administered to pets, even in small doses, they can cause life-threatening consequences.

According to David Samadi of , the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently increased their warnings about the use of these drugs for people. After reviewing a number of studies, they have determined that NSAIDs significantly increase the risk of strokes and heart attacks. The FDA now requires that NSAID labels include the following: “The risk of heart attack or stroke can occur as early as the first weeks of using an NSAID. The risk may increase with longer use of the NSAID. The risk appears greater at higher doses.”

There is no evidence in dogs that documents an association between NSAIDs and the incidence of heart disease or strokes.

Questions for your veterinarian

Hello, Christy,
Activated charcoal can act as an adsorbent (kind of a "chemical sponge") to bind toxins in the gut. If you use a preparation that is safe for people and use a smaller dose, it should be harmless.
If the problem was an insect sting, I doubt that there are any toxins in the gut that the charcoal would help with.
So many times we are unable to determine the source of the allergen.
Kenalog is a long-acting corticosteroid (cortisone) injection that stays in the body for weeks, where the dexamethasone lasts only a couple of days.
Antihistamines like benadryl are often helpful for something like an insect sting, even though most dogs don't get much relief from them in regard to allergic itching.

Dogs on steroids long term effects

dogs on steroids long term effects

People medications are not safe for pets
Please don’t ever give your dog an NSAID that has been approved for use in people. Some examples include Advil®, Motrin®, Ibuprofen, Aleve®, Naprosyn, and Celebrex®. When administered to pets, even in small doses, they can cause life-threatening consequences.

According to David Samadi of , the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently increased their warnings about the use of these drugs for people. After reviewing a number of studies, they have determined that NSAIDs significantly increase the risk of strokes and heart attacks. The FDA now requires that NSAID labels include the following: “The risk of heart attack or stroke can occur as early as the first weeks of using an NSAID. The risk may increase with longer use of the NSAID. The risk appears greater at higher doses.”

There is no evidence in dogs that documents an association between NSAIDs and the incidence of heart disease or strokes.

Questions for your veterinarian

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