Corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses definition

Cream, ointment, solution, gel, or lotion: Apply to affected area two to four times a day

Comments :
-Occlusive dressings may be used for the management of psoriasis or other recalcitrant conditions.
-If an infection develops, the use of occlusive dressings should be discontinued and appropriate antimicrobial therapy initiated.
-The safety and efficacy of drug use for longer than 4 weeks have not been established.

Use: Relief of the inflammatory and pruritic manifestations of corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses

According to the manufacturer, it is not known whether topical administration of flurandrenolide could result in sufficient systemic absorption to produce detectable quantities in breast milk. However, most dermatologists stress that topical corticosteroids can be safely used during lactation and breast-feeding. If applied topically, care should be used to ensure the infant will not come into direct contact with the area of application, such as the breast. Increased blood pressure has been reported in an infant whose mother applied a high potency topical corticosteroid ointment directly to the nipples. Consider the benefits of breast-feeding, the risk of potential infant drug exposure, and the risk of an untreated or inadequately treated condition. If a breast-feeding infant experiences an adverse effect related to a maternally ingested drug, healthcare providers are encouraged to report the adverse effect to the FDA.

Pregnancy: Teratogenic Effects: Pregnancy Category C - Corticosteroids have been shown to be teratogenic in laboratory animals when administered systemically at relatively low dosage levels. Some corticosteroids have been shown to be teratogenic after dermal application in laboratory animals. Animal reproductive studies have not been conducted with Tridesilon (desonide) Cream, %. It is also not known whether Tridesilon (desonide) Cream, % can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman or can affect reproduction capacity. There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. Tridesilon (desonide) Cream, % should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus.

See Contraindications. Potentiated by CYP3A4 inhibitors (eg, ketoconazole, macrolides), cyclosporine, estrogens. Antagonized by CYP3A4 inducers (eg, barbiturates, phenytoin, carbama-zepine, rifampin), cholestyramine, aminoglutethimide. May potentiate cyclosporine. May antagonize anticoagulants (monitor), isoniazid. Increased risk of arrhythmias with digitalis. May need to adjust dose of antidiabetic agents. Increased GI effects with aspirin or NSAIDs. Caution with aspirin in hypoprothrombinemia. Monitor for hypokalemia with potassium-depleting drugs. Withdraw anticholinesterase agents at least 24hrs before initiating therapy. May suppress reactions to skin tests.

Ophthalmic Route
Dexamethasone: Following ophthalmic administration, dexamethasone is absorbed through the aqueous humor, with only minimal systemic absorption occurring. Clinical evidence of absorption usually does not occur because topical ophthalmic corticosteroid doses are less than when the drugs are given systemically. The onset of action typically occurs within a few days, but it can take as long as 7 days. Ophthalmic dexamethasone is distributed into local tissues and is metabolized locally.
Tobramycin: Animal data suggest that tobramycin is absorbed into the aqueous humor after topical administration of an ophthalmic solution containing the drug. It is not known whether tobramycin is absorbed into the vitreous humor. Absorption of tobramycin into the aqueous humor is greatest when the cornea is abraded. The manufacturer states that topically administered tobramycin is cleared from the surface of the eye in approximately 15—30 minutes when administered as a solution. Information on absorption of tobramycin following administration of an ophthalmic ointment containing the drug is not available.

Corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses definition

corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses definition

See Contraindications. Potentiated by CYP3A4 inhibitors (eg, ketoconazole, macrolides), cyclosporine, estrogens. Antagonized by CYP3A4 inducers (eg, barbiturates, phenytoin, carbama-zepine, rifampin), cholestyramine, aminoglutethimide. May potentiate cyclosporine. May antagonize anticoagulants (monitor), isoniazid. Increased risk of arrhythmias with digitalis. May need to adjust dose of antidiabetic agents. Increased GI effects with aspirin or NSAIDs. Caution with aspirin in hypoprothrombinemia. Monitor for hypokalemia with potassium-depleting drugs. Withdraw anticholinesterase agents at least 24hrs before initiating therapy. May suppress reactions to skin tests.

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